On 12-13 October in Tallinn, the Estonian presidency of the EU and the European Commission jointly organised a conference on the implementation and future of the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund. Seas At Risk spoke in support of funding for marine protection to achieve healthy productive seas, the basis for thriving coastal communities.

The EU Marine Directive requires Member States to achieve clean, healthy and productive EU seas by 2020 -  a much needed holistic approach to marine management. However, 2020 is only two years away and NGOs are concerned that action by Member States is too slow and Programmes of Measures  too weak.  Seas At Risk has therefore launched a campaign to get European citizens involved to  encourage EU Ministers to take further action to achieve their noble commitment.

Ahead of the next Agrifish Council, Seas At Risk and the Fisheries Secretariat published their recommendations to EU fisheries ministers on Baltic Sea fishing quotas in 2018.

Today 24% of all seafood consumed in the European Union comes from aquaculture. In order to reduce environmental pressures by aquaculture on marine ecosystems, aquaculture needs to become more sustainable. A cornerstone in achieving this goal is to introduce alternative feeds, which do not use fishmeal and fish oil. For this, protein-rich insect larvae have particularly great potential.

The efficiency of the 10% best ships reveals how stringent the requirements should be.

In response to the letter sent by Seas At Risk and 6 other NGOs calling on the EU institutions to give up their addiction to single use plastics, the Commission and the Council both claim they are working towards greener public procurement. The Parliament has to date provided no response to the letter sent on 31st March, raising questions on their commitment to the Circular Economy.

Shipping industry proposals for "carbon neutral growth" would mean 4 degree of warming and climate catastrophe. Which shipping companies support that?

Video Shipping will not cut its carbon footprint by 2050

Seas At Risk welcomes the decision of the European Parliament for a robust North Sea multiannual management plan that will effectively see an end to overfishing of species living near the sea bottom in that region. The plan covers fish stocks that represent almost 70% of the North Sea catch.

During its annual meeting, the International Seabed Authority (ISA) set a target date of 2020 to finalise the regulations for the exploitation of minerals in the deep sea, bringing the start of large-scale mining within close range. During the meeting, the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition called on the member states to open closed doors, bring transparency to the heart of its work and to put into place an Environment Committee.

The European Parliament Fisheries Committee voted last week on the multiannual management plan for demersal species in the North Sea. The outcome of the decision contained both negative and positive aspects.