In 2016, the European Parliament and the Council adopted a new deep-sea regulation, bringing outdated EU legislation in line with international agreements and scientific developments. To ensure that the new objectives are being achieved as foreseen, Seas At Risk and allied NGOs have written to Commissioner Vella, calling for an effective implementation of the deep sea regulation, to protect deep-sea ecosystems from the harmful impacts of deep-sea fishing. 

Seven European environmental NGOs are challenging the European Council, Parliament and Commission to practice what they preach and implement greener public procurement in their own buildings by phasing out single use plastics.

Europe we want 01b

Brussels - Seas At Risk joined over 230 European civil society organisations and trade unions in a common appeal to the leaders of Europe with the following statement.

Next week, experts and stakeholders from across the world will be gathering together in Berlin to discuss a draft environmental regulation for deep sea mining. The fundamental question, i.e. whether or not there is a need for this industry, bearing in mind the global objective to move to a sustainable future, is however lacking from the agenda.

The implementation of the Maritime Spatial Planning Directive is gathering momentum. Seas At Risk brought NGOs from across Europe together for a two day workshop to examine how maritime spatial planning can help deliver the EU objective of achieving good environmental status of seas and oceans by 2020. The participants investigated good practice principles for maritime spatial planning and discussed possible joint actions to ensure effective involvement of NGOs in the upcoming public consultation processes.

Ocean acidification could cause an annual damage to the European shellfish production of €0.9 billion by 2100, according to a recent study.

In its first meeting in Madrid on 14th February, the working group on finfish of the Aquaculture Advisory Council elected its chair and vice-chair (Javier Ojeda (APROMAR) and Phil Brook (CiWF) respectively) and established four sub-working groups to discuss fish feed as well as  animal health law, animal welfare,  and Blue Growth/ a level playing field.

The European Parliament has agreed to support a proposal from its own Environment Committee to include shipping in the EU’s greenhouse gas emissions trading scheme (ETS).

Member states have put in place over 200 marine monitoring programmes across the EU to measure the quality of the marine environment and to evaluate the effectiveness of the policy measures that they are taking to improve it. However, an evaluation by the European Commission shows that those data collection efforts fail to cover some key problems, such as marine litter and noise pollution.

This week, the European Parliament’s Environment Committee voted on a set of amendments to waste legislation that is being revised to bring about a circular economy in Europe. Overall the amendments strengthened the initial Commission proposals.